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1011 Parkside Main, Greensboro, GA 30642 Between the Publix Parking Lot and the Movie Theater

Cavities Are On The Rise In Preschoolers

April 19, 2012

A RECENT STORY IN THE NEW YORK TIMES has left parents worrying about their young children’s oral health. Why, you ask? Tooth decay is on the rise, especially in toddlers and preschoolers. However, even if you don’t have kids this age, or kids at all, you may have grandkids, neighbors, and/or friends with kids that might find this information useful. Spread the word!!

More and more, dentists like Drs. Bradley and Dr. Boswell are seeing preschoolers with an average of 10 cavities at a time. In fact, the article points out that the problem has become so serious that many kids now require general anesthesia during their cavity fillings because they are unable to sit through such extensive procedures when they are awake.

In the news report, one poor 2-year-old boy had 11 cavities, forcing him to endure two extractions, a root canal, and 7 other fillings and crowns for the rest of his decayed teeth. And this toddler is not alone! Research shows that oral infection is the number one chronic disease in children, and over 50% of today’s toddlers will have some sort of tooth decay before they are 5.So, what is causing all this decay, and how do we prevent it!?

Severe tooth decay can be caused by a variety of young children’s habits such as endless snacking, sugar-rich foods, refined foods such as white bread, sweet drinks before bedtime, un-fluoridated bottled water, lack of flossing, and a general abhorrence of oral care. Many parents have to fight with their children to brush their teeth once a day, let alone the recommended “two-minutes, twice-a-day!” However, this is one battle that is definitely worth fighting.

A lot of parents are also unaware that they should bring their babies to the dentist by age 1 to be checked for future cavity risk.

So, here’s what you can do: cut the overload of sugary snacks out of your children’s diets like raisins and fruit roll-ups, make sure you are giving them tap water instead of bottled, help them brush their teeth at least twice a day and floss once until they are 8 or able to write in cursive, and bring them to our practice for regular checkups!

We look forward to helping you improve your child’s oral health!!Request an appointment.

I Don’t Have My Toothbrush, But I Have Cheese!

December 22, 2011

HOLIDAY SHOPPING, NEIGHBORHOOD PARTIES, seasonal shows, and sledding are all fun winter activities. However, most of us don’t bring along our toothbrush and floss when we’re out and about…

So, here are a few ways you can prevent cavities while you’re away from home…

Crunchy fruits and vegetables such as apples, carrots, cucumbers, and celery can help to mechanically clean food debris and bacteria from your teeth.

In addition, fruits such as cranberries, blueberries, and apples contain nutrients that decrease the stickiness of the bacteria that cause cavities. Green and black teas also contain minerals that can reduce the growth of bacteria on your teeth.

And best of all…Cheese. While the mechanism is not completely understood, numerous studies have shown that eating cheese after eating a sugary snack greatly reduces the damage to your teeth. Cheese tends to increase the amount of saliva in your mouth which helps keep cavities at bay. Cheese can also help neutralize the acid that bacteria produce. Calcium, phosphorous, and proteins in cheese may also help remineralize damaged tooth enamel. The best thing is that cheese just tastes so darn good.

So, at your neighbor’s next holiday party, hit up the cheese tray and fruit & veggie platters after you scarf down that gingerbread parfait and pumpkin pie…Your oral health will thank you, and so will your dentist!The only thing better than a beautiful smile, is a beautiful smilethat’s healthy and cavity-free!Contact us if you have any additional questions, and don’t forget to “Like” us on Facebook!

We Let YOU Be Part Of The Team With The Intra-Oral Camera

September 13, 2011

HERE AT LAKE OCONEE DENTISTRY, OUR TEAM TAKES GREAT PRIDE IN utilizing the most advanced technologies available in caring for your oral health.

One of the neat things about today’s technologies—especially in the case of using an intra-oral camera—is that YOU can be involved in the process of diagnosing the health of your teeth.

Our intra-oral camera is an amazing handheld device that combines an extremely bright light source with a tiny, high definition video camera. Most intra-oral cameras look a lot like a writing pen, and when moved around inside your mouth, they give our team the ability to see enlarged, detailed images of the surfaces of your teeth, the condition of your gums, and other valuable information about the tissues inside your mouth.

Drs. Bradley and Dr. Boswell or a team member will use this tiny device to capture close-up pictures of your teeth that we often display on a monitor. Intra-oral cameras don’t cause any type of pain, discomfort, or ill side effects. They help us see tarnished or corroded fillings, decay, bleeding gums, plaque, or hairline fractures in your teeth, in real time, as you sit comfortably in our dental chair!

If you’re interested in seeing the images, an intra-oral camera allows you to see what Drs. Bradley and Dr. Boswell and our team see. It’s not only quite fascinating for many of our patients, but it also helps you better understand the recommendations we make. You’ve heard the old saying, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”Recently, an intra-oral camera was used on an episode of The Doctors:

Here at Lake Oconee Dentistry, we place great importance on each long-standing relationship we have with you, our valued patients. Thank you for the trust you place in us. If you have any questions about intra-oral cameras—or any other matter related to your oral health—please don’t hesitate to ask.

No matter where you are, you can also check out more about our practice by visiting and LIKING our Facebook page:

Stay Informed About Early Childhood Caries

July 19, 2011

EACH YEAR, MANY INFANTS AND TODDLERS SUFFER FROM EXTENSIVE TOOTH DECAY that could be avoided—and the culprit is surprising. Milk and sweet liquids are the biggest contributors to something referred to as ECC (Early Childhood Caries).

Just like adult mouths, babies’ mouths are full of bacteria that feed on the sugars found in the foods and liquids they consume. One of the byproducts of these bacteria buffets is an acid that can attack tooth enamel and cause cavities.

Now, don’t worry… We’re not suggesting that you stop using baby bottles or that you don’t give milk to your infants and toddlers. Drs. Bradley and Dr. Boswell simply recommend being aware of the issue and taking some simple preventive steps to help avoid a potential problem.

Here’s a short video from Nursery Water about preventing baby bottle tooth decay:

Many parents give their children a bottle to suck on as a way of helping them settle down and doze off at night. Unfortunately, studies show thatwhen a baby falls asleep with the bottle in his or her mouth, the fluid from the bottle can settle in a pool around their fragile teeth. This allows the bacteria in the baby’s mouth to feed off the sugar present in the liquid ALL night long, creating a steady stream of tooth-decaying acid. If your child absolutely needs a bottle to suck on as he or she goes to sleep, your best bet is to fill it with warm water. Or, once asleep, at least be sure to remove the bottle from your child’s mouth.

Here are a few other ways you can take care of your baby’s teeth:

  • Only Fill Bottles with Milk Or Formula. If you choose to give your child juice or other sugary drinks, make sure you only do so in a sippy cup so that the sugar doesn’t sit at the front of their mouths too long.
  • Clean Your Baby’s Teeth and Gums. Even before your child’s first teeth have come in, it’s important to gently wipe their teeth with a wet towel or gauze after they are fed.
  • Don’t Dip Pacifiers In Anything Containing Sugar. Some parents dip pacifiers in sweet substances like honey. This can be very damaging for baby teeth.

ECC is an infectious disease that can begin as soon as the baby’s first teeth appear, and it can have lasting, damaging effects on your child’s oral health. Here at Lake Oconee Dentistry we want to help you take care of your baby’s teeth. Not only are they more susceptible to cavities than are adults, but they are also at risk of gum disease if the bacteria in their mouths gets too out of hand.

If you think your child may be a victim of baby bottle tooth decay, set up an appointment to come in and see one of our doctors, or a member of our team today. We’d love to help return your baby’s mouth to its healthiest state! Feel free to contact usif you have any additional questions or concerns!

Why Children Should Visit the Dentist

June 3, 2011

WE UNDERSTAND THAT THOSE OF YOU WITH YOUNG CHILDREN probably have quite a few questions about caring for your children’s teeth. So, we thought we’d take a few moments to talk about why your little one needs a dentist too…

Although there are a host of benefits associated with proper pediatric dental care, the long term health of your child’s smile is obviously the most important benefit of all. The American Dental Associationrecommends that a child’s first visit to the dentist be right before their first birthday. During this checkup, Dr. David Bradley will teach you the proper brushing and flossing techniques to use on your child, make sure his or her baby teeth are coming in correctly, check to see if there is any baby bottle tooth decay, and ensure that your child’s gums are healthy.

Children should typically come in to see our practice about every six months to ensure that their teeth are receiving the best possible care.

Once all your child’s primary teeth have come in, Dr. Patti Bradley will typically start applying topical fluoride to harden the tooth enamel and protect those young teeth from cavities. Dental sealants can also be applied as a means of providing further protection from bacteria.

Another important thing to consider when taking care of your children’s teeth is their diet. An abundance of sugary foods and unhealthy snacks like potato chips and pretzels should be avoided.

Don’t wait until your child has a full set of teeth to visit the dentist. Set up an appointmentwith Dr. Patti or Dr. David or Dr. Phil Boswell today if you have any additional questions or if you have a child due for a checkup! We want to make sure your child’s smile stays confident and healthy for life!

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